Posted in Family, Kids, Life, work

Reflections

Today, I’m #20 on the call schedule after being #2 last night.  It wasn’t bad… I left work around 7:30p and never got called back to the hospital.  That’s a great #2 night!  A couple of days ago, I awoke with a pinched nerve along the left side of my neck and it’s incredibly uncomfortable turning my head and just doing regular tasks (i.e. making the bed).  Right now, I wreak of Bengay and I’m partially comforted with some Aleve.  Hot compress, you are next!  Sometimes, it’s really nice to enjoy a lazy morning with zero agenda other than to catch up on life and maybe even do some self reflection.

A buddy of mine sent me this article and asked me my thoughts….

How Many Children Should You Have?

I gave it a once over and thought, this is interested.  A small sample size of various parents from various geographical regions all commenting on their children.  Their is italicized because it seems like commenting on what the perfect number of children to have is so personal and completely unique to their experience.

It’s a heavy duty article with a lot of good perspective. I kind of agree with them all. I liked the one with 3 kids best… and the one with no kids the least. Since when did the purpose of procreation become about supporting the older generation? I had a tough one with that. I don’t think people have kids to look after them in old age.

What do u think?


This article came at a perfect time for me.  Bear and I just got married; we’re older… and we’re looking to start a family.  I just went on an Amazon spending spree for knowledge:

Even as an M.D., I am thirsty for knowledge in an area that I know pretty little about.  Sure, I’ve rotated on OB/GYN as a med student — but that was back in 2005.  Plus, doing two months of a rotation doesn’t equal a full understanding of mom’s body and baby’s development.  It taught me how to safely deliver a baby, but I need to know and understand the building blocks leading up to that.  Secondly, I’m an anesthesiologist who places labor epidurals for our pregnant ladies getting ready to welcome their little bundles of joy into the world.  I typically meet the moms when they are having contractions and wanting pain control and follow-up with them at delivery.  So you can see, there’s a 9 month knowledge gap that I need to fill in.

If you’re a future mom and are interested in an epidural, educate yourself on the pros and cons as well as what you expect to feel and when to ask for an epidural.

My blog post regarding OB Anesthesia

Remember, it is dependent on YOU as you are in control of your pain.  A pain scale will vary from person to person (i.e. everyone has different pain tolerances).  There’s no magical dilation number that tells you when to ask for an epidural.  Keep in mind that you will need to hold extremely still when you do ask for an epidural.  So please make it easy on your anesthesiologist (and yourself) and ask for an epidural when you are able to be as motionless as a statue — otherwise, it may be too risky to request an epidural if you are in too much pain to stay still.

 

Posted in Family, Kids, Life, Relationships, Wedding

Our wedding – Feb 4, 2017

The best day ever.

Our AppyCouple wedding website

Our Wedding Pinterest Board

Our Honeyfund

 


Our Wedding Day
0052kris_ross
Bridal Veil: Mia Bella Couture
Bridesmaids: Vow to Be Chic
Cake: VG Donuts
DJ: Elite British DJ (Mick)
Rings: Brilliant Diamonds – Tacori (Ariel)
Wedding Planner: I do weddings (Melissa)
First Dance choreography:  Wedding Dance San Diego (Liz O’Grady)
Photo: True Photography (Billy)
Video: Campbellicious (KC)
 
0001kris_ross

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Posted in Family, Kids, Life

Birth plan: Vaginal delivery vs. Elective C-section

Today, I’m the OB anesthesiologist on call.  Hours in the L&D OR have provided me with a “real” understanding of what is involved in a C-section (C/S).  I’ve seen countless spontaneous vaginal deliveries (SVD) including natural birth (without pain medications), deliveries with epidurals, vacuum-assisted deliveries, shoulder dystocias, postpartum hemorrhages, etc.  A lot can happen to both the mom and the baby — and it can be scary.  Someday, I’d like to have my own family, and it got me thinking about what I would like to choose for my “birth plan”.  As much emphasis is placed on this…it’s really out of your control. The idea seems nice in that you feel like you have control, but nature has a very interesting way of doing what it will do irrespective of your plans.

One of our OBs had her two children via elective C/S. Given that a C/S is major surgery, I often wondered why one would electively choose to go that route vs. vaginal delivery.  I opted to take a poll on the OB floor (nurses, docs, midwives, staff, etc.)….

The results:

  • CS decreases urinary incontinence/vaginal prolapse
  • CS offers a time/schedule/control
  • SVD seems to offer shorter hospital stay and improved breathing in the neonate
  • Personal preference

But a little research….

ACOG Committee Opinion: Cesarean Delivery by Maternal Request

I loved my elective C-section

Pros and Cons of elective c-section

Vaginal Birth vs. C-section

A gal’s account of her elective c-section

CMAJ: Planned elective c-section — a reasonable choice for some women?

Clinical Perinatology: CS vs Vaginal Delivery: Long term infant outcomes

The Guardian: Vaginal birth vs. C-Section

A Canadian gal’s account of her elective c-section

Posted in Family, Kids, Life

Hormone stimulation for oocyte retrieval #eggs #fertility #hormones #professional #women

I’m a professional.  

On call in the hospital
On call in the hospital

What does that even mean?  My best guess is that it means I went to school for a long time and entered a career where I get to behave professionally and interact with people.  Fast forward 18 years after graduating high school and I have a successful career in medicine doing anesthesia.  I have met some fantastic people along my journey and I’ve traveled and experienced life to the fullest.

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So why this post?

Because I’m 35 and according to the OB/GYNs…I’m AMA (advanced maternal age).  In a nutshell, it means that after the age of 35, there are significant (possibly exponential?) risks of chromosomal abnormalities with my eggs or there could be serious problems with my baby at my age.  The older I get, the more I’d like the option of having a family… and that’s whether I meet the right guy or not.

From Wikipedia (James Heilman, MD): The risk of having a Down syndrome pregnancy in relation to a mothers age.

What’s it like to undergo hormone stimulation?

Tues, March 3:  I’m currently on day #5 of injections and I still feel normal (i.e. no crazy hormonal emotions or anything; no bloating; no weird experiences, etc.). I don’t have any emotional drama; no crazy hormonal thoughts or outbursts. I actually feel pretty normal.  No bloating, no PMS, etc. I don’t know what I’m supposed to feel bc I feel just normal… like a normal day without the injections.  Now, the injections –> I’m starting to dread the 7pm hour bc these injections are starting to hurt!  I’m a pretty tough cookie… don’t be fooled by the smiling youngish face.

The meds and my mini sharps container
The meds and my mini sharps container

Fri, March 6: I’m bloated.  Cravings are starting to kick in, but maybe it’s just stress at work?  No crazy emotional stuff.

Sat, March 7: The bloating continues.  In fact, my ovaries are pretty sensitive — any big bounces in the car or if I sit down hard is painfully noticeable.  The Ganirelix stings a little bit more than the others on injection.  No big hikes or active things: no trail running, no running (period!), no elliptical, no jumping.  I’m starting my couch potato life and getting stir-crazy!  But, I did do a 7 mile flat hike today — I couldn’t help it!

Sun, March 8: The bloating continues.  I definitely feel the pull/sensitivity of both my ovaries.  Even when I empty my bladder, the pressure/tug release is definitely present.  Huge mishap today: I underestimated how much Follistim I had!  Today, I was supposed to go up on Menopur, but I didn’t have any extra, so I was told to take my standard 150 dose.  Yet, they told me to go up to 300 on Follistim today and I barely had any when I stuck the needle in! I remembered I had an extra vial with just a small amount left and injected that.  it was only 150.  3 injections in one night is no fun.

Mon, March 9: Gave myself an additional 150 follistim this morning once the pharmacy opened.  15mm follicles are looking good!  My left ovary has a ton!  The right ovary is doing alright as well.  Just waiting to get the estrogen level up.  Same bloated feeling.  No physical activity or heavy lifting.

Tues, March 10: Estrogen is finally above 1,000! Apparently after many years of birth control pills, it suppresses estrogen… on track!

Thurs, March 12: All systems go for Friday retrieval. 🙂  My last injection was this morning.  I’m incredibly happy to be done with those!  The indomethacin makes my head cloudy — not sure I like the feeling.

Fri, March 13: yes it’s Friday the 13th. But I’m not superstitious. Showed up at 6 am and proceeded with paperwork. Estrogen and progesterone levels were fantastic. Went back to the OR around 7am. A little propofol and fentanyl for my MAC case. I requested no versed. Some Toradol in the pacu to help with cramping. Had a fine relaxing day after. Took some tylenol for cramps. They retrieved 13 eggs. 6 mature ones and 5 not quite mature ones.  Wonder what we do from here. I’m still super bloated and my doc said no physical activity for 2 weeks.

Tues, March 17: The bloating is getting better.  There wasn’t much cramping or pain or spotting after the retrieval.  Maybe I am lucky?  I only took Tylenol twice since Friday.  The bloating was extremely intense Saturday, Sunday, and Monday.  I feel that it is better today.

Wed, March 18: I was thinking more about the numbers of eggs retrieved and came upon a couple of different articles and resources.  I haven’t chatted with my doc yet.

Taken from Wikipedia
Taken from Wikipedia

Here’s the replay of my series of events:

  • Wed, Jan 28: Ultrasound to assess # of follicles.  Start antibiotics (5 day z-pak).  Start taking prenatal vitamins, vitamin D, and baby aspirin daily.
  • Sun, Feb 22: Stopped birth control pills per Fertility Doc who had me start and stop these a couple of times.
  • Thursday, Feb 26: Morning blood draw and afternoon ultrasound.
  • Fri, Feb 27: Start Menopur 150IU SQ and Follistim 150 SQ @ 7-9pm
  • Sat, Feb 28: Menopur 150 IU, Follistim 150
  • Sun, Mar 1: Morning blood draw. Menopur 150, Follistim 150
  • Mon, Mar 2: Morning blood draw. Menopur 150, Follistim 200
  • Tues, Mar 3: Morning blood draw. Afternoon ultrasound. Menopur 150, Follistim 250
  • Wed, Mar 4: Morning blood draw. Menopur 150, Follistim 250
  • Thurs, Mar 5: Morning blood draw. Afternoon ultrasound. Menopur 150, Follistim 250.
  • Fri, Mar 6: Morning blood draw. Menopur 150, follistim 250.
  • Sat, Mar 7: Morning blood draw and ultrasound. AM Ganirelix start. PM Menopur 150, Follistim 275.
  • Sun, Mar 8: Morning blood draw.  Ganirelix. Menopur 150, Follistim 300 (but I only injected 150 bc I ran out!).
  • Mon, Mar 9: Morning blood draw and ultrasound.  Ganirelix, Follistim 150.  Menopur 150, Follistim 300.
  • Tues, Mar 10: Morning blood draw and ultrasound. Ganirelix. Menopur 150, Follistim 275 (ugh! i ran out again!).
  • Wed, Mar 11: Morning blood draw and ultrasound.  Ganirelix. Indomethacin 50 tid. Lupron 0.8ml @19:30. Pregnyl 1000U IM.
  • Thurs, Mar 12: Lupron @ 7:30a. Morning blood draw. Indomethacin tid. NPO after 10pm.
  • Fri, Mar 13: Oocyte retrieval @ 7:00a. Doxycycline 100 bid.  No heavy lifting (>10 lbs for a couple of days — better yet I was told two weeks!).
  • Sat, Mar 14:  Doxycycline 100 bid.  Restart baby aspirin, prenatal vitamins.
  • Sun, Mar 15:  Doxycycline 100 bid.  Baby aspirin, prenatal vitamins.
  • Mon, Mar 16:  Doxycycline 100 bid.  Baby aspirin, prenatal vitamins.
  • Tues, Mar 17:  Doxycycline 100 bid.  Baby aspirin, prenatal vitamins.
  • Wed, Mar 18:  Doxycycline 100 bid.  Baby aspirin, prenatal vitamins.
  • Thurs, Mar 19: Could this be my first normal day??? Holy cow!
  • Fri, Mar 27:  They said they got 13 eggs… but they didn’t tell me 6 were mature and 3 were intermediate. When i had my initial consultation… i told her i wanted 2-4 kids possible.  If i assume wcs (worst case scenario), which i should in this case… that would mean at best only 1 or 2 kids.  I was completely deflated. so i am going to do a second round.  it’s not what i want to do, but it’s my best chance.  She thinks it’s bc i’ve been on bc pill for so long, so i can’t take those from now until my next go.  She’s aiming for July 2015.  She saw plenty of follicles (which is good)…. but my hormones had been suppressed so long bc of the bc pill.  I’m sad bc i have to do this again…. and it was hard enough the first time.
  • In this whole process, I met a wonderful man. We are looking at doing embryos for a higher success rate.
  • Mon, July 13: Prolactin level is 38 on re-draw from fri. 😀 that is normally where I hang out. We decided no repeat MRI (I had been getting them annually for 5 years after surgery to assess growth — I think last was 2010). No growth with drawing prolactin at those times as well as checking for visual field defects annually still. All points to good signs. She’s going to reach out to my endocrinologist and I’m going to get back on bromocriptine (to make my prolactin normal). I wanted to normalize prolactin first before getting on an estrogen stimulating med (that can grow the old prolactinoma). So… I also told her about you and that we’re looking at a possibility of embryos instead of just eggs. She felt very positive about that bc she said I had plenty of follicles and that would ultimately a higher success rate. And she also knows about my prior long use of birth control pills for regulating periods (bc of prolactinoma). All of this points to a good sign that things are normalizing and we have a plan. She said she’d like to see me on bromocriptine for about 3months and would be getting another prolactin draw 6mo after starting that med.

When I was a kid and had to get immunized, my dad used to tell me “don’t be a chicken shit.”  And I wasn’t.  When I was 4, I vividly remember putting my arm out voluntarily when I had to get a shot.  What’s more odd, is that at the tender age of 4, I would watch the needle placement into my arm and not look away.  It was single-handedly one of the best lessons my dad ever taught me.  Face your fears directly.  So, my present-day self is perhaps a bit more squeamish giving my own shots into my abdomen.  The injections are given subcutaneously, which means that it goes into the fat layer below the skin but above the muscle.

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Why Am I Doing This?

I wanted to preserve my fertility and not feel so rushed to find “Mr. Right For Me.”  To be honest, I never thought I would be taking this journey… let alone by myself.  I always envisioned being with the love of my life and starting a family once I achieved my career.  But nature and the biological clock don’t stop.  That’s life.  So I’m making the best of my situation and hoping to preserve my future and share it with someone who will explore and share this journey of life with me.

Because in the end, happiness deserves to be shared.

Another gal’s journey and exploration


Updated Nov 1, 2015 from the NEJM

Teaching Topic
Cryopreservation of Oocytes
CLINICAL PRACTICE

G.L. Schattman

CME Exam   Full Text Audio  Comments

In the United States, more than 100,000 women of reproductive age receive a diagnosis of cancer each year, and they are at risk for diminished reproductive potential or infertility as a result of treatment. The freezing of oocytes has become a clinically viable option for women who wish to have a child in the future but are facing either an age-related or iatrogenic decrease in the quality and quantity of oocytes.

Clinical Pearls
Clinical Pearl  What is currently the preferred method for cryopreservation of oocytes?

The large size and high water content of oocytes make the formation of ice crystals and subsequent cell injury or death difficult to avoid during the cooling process. Vitrification has replaced the slow-freeze method as the method of choice for cryopreserving oocytes, since it minimizes ice-crystal formation and results in higher rates of cell survival, fertilization, embryo development, and pregnancy. As compared with the slow-freeze method, vitrification involves exposure of oocytes to relatively higher concentrations of cryoprotectants for a shorter duration, followed by ultrarapid cooling either through direct immersion into liquid nitrogen (in so-called open systems) or with the use of small, volume-sealed straws (in closed systems). Once vitrified, the cells can be stored indefinitely in liquid nitrogen.

Clinical Pearl  Is there an association between cryopreservation of oocytes and subsequent congenital abnormalities?

Oocyte cryopreservation by means of slow freezing or vitrification has not been shown to increase the incidence of aneuploidy or congenital abnormalities in children, although long-term studies involving large numbers of births resulting from thawed oocytes are still lacking. Collection of data on long-term outcomes by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology is under way.

Morning Report Questions
Q. What factors are central to the likelihood of achieving a live birth using cryopreserved oocytes?

A. In determining the probability of achieving a live birth with the use of cryopreserved oocytes, the two most critical factors are the woman’s age at oocyte collection and the total number of oocytes available. Rates of embryo implantation decline as women age, owing to increased embryo aneuploidy; this risk applies also to cryopreserved oocytes obtained from older women. Whether cryopreservation further damages the oocyte beyond the normal age-related decrease in oocyte quality is unknown. In a prospective study evaluating the efficiency of oocyte vitrification, the proportion of vitrified oocytes that resulted in a live birth was 8.2% (12.1 oocytes per live birth) in women 30 to 36 years of age and 3.3% (29.6 oocytes per live birth) in women 36 to 39 years of age. In a multicenter observational study that assessed predictors of outcome when oocytes were vitrified, the live-birth rate decreased by 7% for every year of increase in the age of the woman. For every additional mature oocyte, the delivery rate increased by 8%.

Q. What are the guidelines of the relevant professional societies concerning oocyte cryopreservation?

A. The American Society for Reproductive Medicine suggests that oocyte vitrification and warming should be recommended to women facing infertility due to chemotherapy or other gonadotoxic therapies. The American Society of Clinical Oncology recommends that “even if women are ambivalent” about having children, they should be referred to a reproductive endocrinologist. However, the guidelines of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine also recommend caution regarding the use of oocyte vitrification to circumvent the effects of age on the reproductive potential of healthy women. These guidelines specifically state that “ . . . there are no data to support the safety, efficacy, ethics, emotional risks and cost-effectiveness of oocyte cryopreservation for this indication.”

Table 1. Reasons to Consider Cryopreservation of Oocytes.


ROUND 2

Cycle day 1- Call doc to schedule a BASE US and blood draw for cycle day 3.
Begin checking for ovulation surge with ovulation predictor kit on cycle day 8.

Call me when the surge is positive.

o Doc will make me a calendar when I surge that maps out the rest of my cycle

6 days post surge you will begin taking Estrace for about 2-3 weeks

After Estrace course you will begin stimulation with Menopur and Follistim again or Menopur and Clomid

Stimulation takes approx 10 days

Retrieval two days later

Posted in Family, Kids, Life, Relationships

Relationship advice from professionals #relationships #marriage #family

Curiosity has always been a driving factor for my learning.  Lately, I’ve been curious about what makes relationships thrive.   Around the holidays, people always seem so happy and connected and together.  This led me to lookup various TED talks (thanks Google search) on the subject matter.  I’m intrigued by others’ relationships — and not just romantically.  A friend of mine shared some interesting pearls on the progression from dating, committed relationship, marriage, to kids and the dynamics/changes that occur through each of these phases.  I just want to know what other people’s experiences are through this journey.  What my search revealed…

The homework:

  1. The Secret to Desire in a Long-term Relationship
  2. Love Isn’t All You Need: 3 Relationship Building Reads
  3. How We Love
    1. Can you use algorithms to find love?
    2. What happens to our brain when we’re in love
    3. Are we asking too much of our spouses?
    4. What makes siblings bond?
    5. A father-daughter dance – in prison?
  4. Talks That Just Might Save Your Relationship
    1. Love, you’re doing it all wrong
    2. The power of vulnerability
    3. How to speak so that people want to listen
    4. Why we love, why we cheat
    5. Dare to disagree
    6. What you don’t know about marriage
  5. In The Mood For Love
    1. The brain in love
    2. Love letters to strangers
    3. Love, no matter what
    4. Love is a loaded pistol
    5. The myth of the gay agenda
    6. Aliens, love — where are they?
    7. How the internet enables intimacy
    8. For men: understanding her desires
  6. Sex: Can We Talk?
    1. 10 things you didn’t know about orgasm
    2. It’s time for “the talk”
    3. Selling condoms in the Congo
    4. Sex, drugs, and HIV
    5. Religions and babies
    6. The beautiful tricks of flowers
    7. A little-told talk of sex and sensuality

Where to Find Love


4 Most Common Relationship Problems and How to Fix Them

  1. The 4 things that kill relationships: Criticism, Defensiveness, Contempt and Stonewalling.
  2. The 3 things that prevent them: Know your partner, respond positively to “bids”, and admire your partner.
  3. The best predictor of relationship success is how you and your partner tell your “story of us.”
  4. The beginning of the conversation is crucial. Negativity compounds. Keep a cool head and resist emotional inertia.

How Texting Changes From Dating to Marriage


Time: How to Have a Great Relationship – 5 New Secrets From Research

  1. According to your own brain, love is right up there with cocaine and cash. And it can last if you treat it right.
  2. Want to be attractive? Make yourself look good, emphasize similarities, and let the person know you’re picky — but that you do like them.
  3. A great first date is something that creates excitement and energy. Share things about yourself and respond positively when your partner does.
  4. Relationships often fail because of individual issues, not because of a bad match. Resolve difficulties as soon as you can; they don’t strengthen relationships, they cripple them.
  5. Improve your relationship by dealing with your personal issues, doing exciting things together, celebrating your partner’s successes and showing gratitude.

My Thoughts:

  1. There’s a lot of meat here.  Very insightful.  I will probably listen to these several times… not just today but throughout the years.  I love her definition and timing of foreplay.  Waxing and waning desire — it’s not spontaneous…but erotic couples know how to resurrect this desire.  
  2. This summarizes three books that I’m intrigued to pickup and read.  
  3. Several talks on Love
    1. A numbers game.  It’s up to us to make a relationship — it takes work.  Technology cannot solve relationships.  It takes human capital…. human work.
    2. Couples’ and sex therapist.  See #1.
    3. Non-sexual, non-romantic love.  Family love.  Parents and favoritism.  I wish someone would go into more depth between spouses and siblings.  I had a great talk with another friend of mine who has a twin sibling.  This has got to be one of the closest bonds ever known.  Yet, he was telling me the difficulty of introducing someone to his sister and how that can sometimes add jealousy, loss of priority, etc. between the siblings.  I don’t think one needs to make a black and white choice — I think siblings and spouses can co-exist…in fact, they should.  Perhaps a better working is the prioritization of spouse to sibling.  I don’t know what that entails…I have no siblings.  However, I have not had any problems introducing any of my significant others to my family without worry of priorities or jealousy.  I think it’s a natural progression in life to introduce an SO to your family and be able to make that individual a priority without having massive panic attacks or arguments.  Yet, I’m still trying to wrap my head around why there would be such sibling rivalry without introduction of SOs.  Does anyone know of a study on this?
    4. 43 years of marriage!  Whoa!  The important roles of fathers in daughters’ lives.
  4. Talks That Just Might Save Your Relationship
    1. Honesty Authenticity Integrity Love.  
    2. This one was humorous!!  Find good in everything!  Men doing chores around the house –> women desire them more –> men become nicer.  Positive good cycle.  

At least this was a good start… there’s so much to learn.  I’ve digested this small piece of information, and I have come to the conclusion that relationships need positivity, communication, consideration, honesty, dependence, independence, desire, and cooperation/teamwork.  But, these were things I knew.  From this information, I think both people involved have to be open and receptive to the other’s needs.  How does the positivity loop get started?  A kind gesture, a sweet compliment, a flirtatious look, a warm touch… all of these are positive vibes to make your partner feel loved.  This in turn generates positive feelings and prompts positive outward energy of love.  

So, why are so many people unhappy if these elements seem so simple?

Posted in Family, Kids, Life, Relationships

The ends of the spectrum #parenting #kids #relationships #romance

TED talk: Let’s Talk Parenting Taboos

This is a great video depicting exactly what it says.  I have no experience in the marriage or kids department, so I decided to watch this couple describe their parenting woes.  They are comical, loving, real, open, honest, and lovable.  Their energy and their overall gentle mutual care and respect for one another is enviable.  Life goal noted.


Now, the other end of the spectrum….

5 Things You Should Know About A Woman Who Doesn’t Need You

I’m not a feminist.  Nor am I super mother-earthy granola yogi.  Some people would describe me as a goal-oriented, kind-hearted, goofy/nerdy, loyal, driven/goal-oriented gal who pursues her dreams.  Then again, others might call me a bitch.  It’s all a matter of perspective, right?  (And haters gotta hate…isn’t that from a song?).  Aside from the 5 things they listed (I realize another item would’ve changed the list to 6 Things…), they forget to mention the deep seated love and emotional aspect of the independent woman.  Maybe that’s buried in items #2 and #3?


Another excellent article that caught my attention…and led me to a new favorite hero….

The Churchill School of Adulthood — Lesson #3: Live Romantically

History isn’t my strong suit.  In fact, I was never really enamored with history.  However, this article nicely unfolds Churchill’s vulnerable persona and I’ve become a huge fan.  Good read if you have time.

Posted in Family, Kids, Life, Nutrition, Relationships, Workouts

What is time?

This article in The Economist highlighted on the very thing that stresses me out daily: time. Maybe it’s my 60+ hour a week job.

Here’s the article: http://www.economist.com/news/christmas-specials/21636612-time-poverty-problem-partly-perception-and-partly-distribution-why?fsrc=scn/gp/te/pe/ed/whyiseveryonesobusy

When I first read the article, I was surprised by the amount of change that had occurred in the work force. On a second read, I was impressed still that even though women are working, they’re still doing most of the work with parenting… Regardless of hours worked. I’m all for team parenting and communication… But I’m really having trouble (because I don’t want to believe) understanding that women are still supposed to be the keepers of the home and family. I feel that there should be a team approach for the benefit of the child…. Not a mommy vs daddy approach (with mommy bearing the brunt of poopy diapers, cleaning, feeding, etc). Yes I understand it’s about bonding… But dads are very important as well!! Now with the current generation, people are staying connected via technology… Yet does it really help with connectedness or is it just a big distraction? Is it an excuse to look busy to have the less fun chores and parenting duties passed on to the more responsible spouse/parent?

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