2018 in Review

January 2018

Bear got a new car! He’s loving his 2018 Highlander Hybrid that we’ve nicknamed “The Spaceship” — all the screens and safety features are incredible! We needed something safer and super reliable to transport our precious cargo!

 

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February 2018

On Sunday, Feb 11, we welcomed our Mini: Arden Elise Campbell. She arrived with a conehead after 27 hours of labor at 10:09pm. She was oriented OP, and I got my epidural at 4cm around 9:30am from one of my colleagues, Shiyin. The epidural was perfect — it was so nice to have to take the edge off the pain. However, because she was OP, I was still having quite a bit of back/bottom pressure from her head coming down and placing a lot of pressure on my tailbone. We tried multiple maneuvers to get her turned, but to no avail. My OB, Kim Washkowiak, came in on her day off to deliver Arden (that’s a huge deal and wonderful Around 9pm, she was 10 cm and complete…and it was time to push! After an hour of pushing an OP baby… we met our sweet Arden bug. She was 7lb 3 oz, 21 inches long, and absolutely perfect. She had a great latch, and we started breastfeeding immediately. Of course, it would take almost a week for my milk to come in. We supplemented with formula and breastfed as well as pumped to increase my milk supply. She’s been a wonderful journey so far. We’re learning new things about and us everyday.
March 2018

This month was a blur! Waking every 2-3 hours in the night to feed Arden made this month fly by! There were highs and lows along my breastfeeding journey. It’s finally settled down and breastfeeding and pumping are going well. We’re still supplementing with formula so she’s getting both.
April 2018

She’s 2 months old this month and already at 10lb! Bear sold his trusty 4Runner.


I forgot to update the rest of the entries…. so, follow along my Pregnancy #2 entries for the remainder of 2018!

 

TAVR Team: conscious sedation vs. general anesthesia

Today, we had a guest speaker Christian Spies from Queen’s Hospital in Hawaii who spoke on his experience with his TAVR team and conscious sedation vs. general anesthesia for these patients.  More specifically, we are speaking of the transfemoral route.

Keypoints:

  • Patient selection is key (consider for COPD; bad for OSA)
  • Short surgical time for monitored anesthesia care (MAC)
  • Decrease invasive monitoring (no PA catheter,+/-CVP)
  • No difference in hospital LOS or 1 year mortality rate
  • Move from TEE to TTE if MAC
  • Be prepared to convert MAC to GA (can be difficult in already tenuous patient in a crowded space under the drapes)
  • MAC agents: dexmetetomidine, propofol, ofirimev
  • Decrease pressor use
  • Develop an algorithm for MAC vs. GA and patient selection

From goinggentleintothatgoodnight.com

For my own lit search:


***Update May 1, 2018***

We at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla do most of our transfemoral TAVRs via conscious sedation assuming appropriate patient selection.  These patients still tend to be the inoperable patients not cleared for open heart AVR (aortic valve replacement).  My techniques and choices for setup have changed over time as I’ve had a chance to fine-tune my plan based on prior experiences with TAVR.  Patients typically come to the hybrid room with a 20g PIV placed by the pre-op RN.

My Setup:

  • 4 channel Alaris pump:
    • dexmedetomidine @ 0.7 mcg/kg/hr until incision –> 0.4 mcg/kg/hr until valve deployment –> off
    • norepinephrine @ 2 mcg/min (titrating on/off, up/down as vitals suggest)
    • Isolyte (IV carrier fluid) @ 200ml/hr until valve deployment –> 50ml/hr
  • Cordis neck line
    • Initially, I would have the interventional cardiologist setup a femoral venous line since they’re getting access to the groin.  However, the cardiologist would use that femoral line for emergent ECMO cannulation and I would lose my venous access and have to depend on a measly 20g PIV.  Nowadays, I try for a short 14g or 16g PIV.  If I can’t get one, the patient gets an awake right IJ cordis for large venous access.
  • Hot line fluid warmer with blood-Y tubing: this is for hookup to a large PIV or cordis line
  • Right radial arterial line
    • I started only placing right radial arterial lines because there was a case of a dissection and I immediately lost my left radial arterial line and couldn’t do pressure monitoring.  I insist on only using the RIGHT radial for my arterial monitoring.  Do not let the cardiologist only give you arterial monitoring based on their femoral arterial access.  It will only give you intermittent monitoring and there are critical points leading up to the deployment where you need CONTINUOUS arterial monitoring.  Therefore, I’ve found the right RADIAL arterial line best for continuous monitoring.
  • Facemask for continuous oxygen at 10L/mim with ETCO2 monitoring
  • For trans-subclavian/axillary approach vs. transfemoral approach TAVR, I’ll put in a supraclavicular block right after Cordis/large-bore PIV venous access for patient comfort while still utilizing conscious sedation/MAC.

My Technique:

  • When the patient gets to the room, transfer patient to OR table.  Start IV fluids @ 200ml/hr.  Cases that go well are about 2 hours from start to end.
  • Facemask O2 at 10L/min.
  • Start sedation: precedex/dexmedetomidine @ 0.7 mcg/kg/hr.  Some patients may receive 1-2mg midazolam x 1 and 25-50mcg fentanyl for radial art line placement.
  • Place right radial art line with lidocaine for skin numbing.  Place PIV with lidocaine.  If unable to get access for PIV, prep neck –> sterile gown/glove/drapes for U/S guided Cordis placement with lidocaine.
  • OR staff preps patient.  Antibiotics prior to incision.
  • At incision –> precedex to 0.4 mcg/kg/hr.  25-50mcg fentanyl PRN discomfort. 10-20mg propofol push for discomfort if needed while large sheath placed for valve deployment.
  • Crossing valve –> BP changes.  Manage with volume or levophed.
  • Valvuloplasty
  • Don’t treat over-drive pacing too aggressively when the valve is deployed.  Typically, once the new valve is in, a little volume will help normalize the BP.
  • Once valve is deployed, turn precedex off.  No other sedation or BP meds needed.  Change IVF rate to 50ml/hr.
  • Patient heads to PACU awake, interactive, and comfortable.

What techniques do you like to do?  Any suggestions on a different approach?