Neuraxial anesthesia and External Cephalic Version

ACOG: If Your Baby is Breech

What is an external cephalic version?

External-Cephalic-Version
From Pregmed.org

Wikipedia: external cephalic version


Randomized trial of anaesthetic interventions in external cephalic version for breech presentation. British Journal of Anaesthesia 114 (6): 944–50 (2015)

  • Conclusions: Spinal Anesthesia (SA: hyperbaric bupivacaine 9mg + fentanyl 15mcg) increased the success rate and reduced pain for both primary and re-attempts of External Cephalic Version (ECV), whereas IV Anesthesia (IVA) using remifentanil infusion (0.1mcg/kg/min) only reduced the pain. There was no significant increase in the incidence of fetal bradycardia or emergency CS, with ECV performed under anaesthetic interventions. Relaxation of the abdominal muscles from SA appears to underlie the improved outcomes for ECV.
  • Editor’s key points: There is no consensus on best anaesthetic technique for external cephalic version (ECV).  In this study, success at ECV was higher using spinal anaesthesia compared with remifentanil infusion or no intervention.  Pain was also reduced in the remifentanil group but success at ECV was no different to the no intervention group.  The effect of spinal anaesthesia in ECV may relate to relaxation of the abdominal musculature.

Neuraxial blockade for external cephalic version: Cost analysis. J Obstet Gynaecol Res. 2015 Jul; 41(7): 1023–1031.

  • Neuraxial blockade is associated with minimal hospital and insurer cost changes in the setting of external cephalic version, while reducing the cesarean delivery rate.

External cephalic version with or without spinal anesthesia: a cost-effectiveness analysis.  American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, January 2016Volume 214, Issue 1, Supplement, Pages S206–S207.  

  • It is both effective and cost-effective to utilize spinal anesthesia to perform ECV in term, nulliparous women with breech fetuses. Translation of this potentially impactful approach into broad obstetric practice should be undertaken.

Effect of Regional Anesthesia on the Success Rate of External Cephalic Version: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Nov; 118(5): 1137–1144.

  • Six RCTs met criteria for study inclusion. Regional anesthesia was associated with a higher external cephalic version success rate compared to intravenous or no analgesia (59.7% vs. 37.6%; pooled RR 1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29-1.93). This significant association persisted when the data was stratified by type of regional anesthesia (spinal vs. epidural). The number needed to treat with regional anesthesia to achieve one additional successful ECV was 5. There was no evidence of statistical heterogeneity (p=0.32, I2=14.9%) or publication bias (Harbord test p=0.78). There was no statistically significant difference in the risk of cesarean delivery comparing regional anesthesia to intravenous or no analgesia (48.4% vs. 59.3%; pooled RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.55-1.17). Adverse events were rare and not significantly different between the two groups.

Does Regional Anesthesia for External Cephalic Version Increase the Risk of Emergent Cesarean Delivery? Obstetrics & Gynecology: May 2016

  • Neuraxial Anesthesia (NA) for External Cephalic Version (ECV) increased the risk of emergent cesarean delivery (CD) without impacting ECV success. These findings differ from previous randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The increased risk and decreased success of our ECVs compared to ECVs performed in the context of RCTs could be explained by patient selection, variation in operator experience or technique, or variation in anesthetic management.  Future studies should further evaluate the risk of NA for ECV in true practice scenarios outside of RCTs.

Clinical outcomes after external cephalic version with spinal anesthesia after failure of a first attempt without anesthesia.  International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. Volume139, Issue3. December 2017: 324-328.

  • Repeat ECV with spinal anesthesia after a failed first attempt without spinal anesthesia increased vertex presentation at birth and decreased the rate of cesarean delivery.

Effect of Intrathecal Bupivacaine Dose on the Success of External Cephalic Version for Breech Presentation: A Prospective, Randomized, Blinded Clinical Trial. Anesthesiology 10 2017, Vol.127, 625-632.

  • Results: A total of 240 subjects were enrolled, and 239 received the intervention. External cephalic version was successful in 123 (51.5%) of 239 patients. Compared with bupivacaine 2.5 mg, the odds (99% CI) for a successful version were 1.0 (0.4 to 2.6), 1.0 (0.4 to 2.7), and 0.9 (0.4 to 2.4) for bupivacaine 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 mg, respectively (P = 0.99). There were no differences in the cesarean delivery rate (P = 0.76) or indication for cesarean delivery (P = 0.82). Time to discharge was increased 60 min (16 to 116 min) with bupivacaine 7.5 mg or higher as compared with 2.5 mg (P = 0.004).
  • Conclusions: A dose of intrathecal bupivacaine greater than 2.5 mg does not lead to an additional increase in external cephalic procedural success or a reduction in cesarean delivery.

 

 

 

 

Methadone and Acute and Chronic Pain Management

We had a journal club where we discussed this article: Anesthesiology, May 2017; Clinical effectiveness and safety of intraoperative methadone in patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion surgery: a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial.

  • IV Methadone 0.2 mg/kg vs IV hydromorphone 2mg at surgical closure in 2+ level spinal fusion
  • Decreased postop IV and opioid requirements and pain scores.  Improved patient satisfaction

Questions:

  1. Is there a pain service following these patients postoperatively?
  2. Exclusions: do you include OSA and BMI>45 patients?
  3. Is ETCO2 and PCA enough to combat respiratory depression on the floor?
  4. Are any discharged on the same day after receiving this dose — think total knees and single level lamis?
  5. Will this improve or worsen the opioid epidemic?
  6. Are surgeons on board with tackling pain multimodally for the benefit of the patient?
  7. For pain follow-up, are there psychiatry, homeopathy, palliative care, PT, holistic approaches for the patient?

Methadone Dose Conversion Guidelines

Intraop Lidocaine for postop pain

Intraop Ketamine for postop pain

Literature search:

Sys Rev 2014: Effectiveness of opioid substitution treatments for patients with opioid dependence: a systematic review and multiple treatment protocol.

Am j of Pub Health, Aug 2014. Determinants of Increased Opioid-Related Mortality in the United States and Canada, 1990–2013: A Systematic Review.

Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2014 Feb; 77(2): 272–284. Long term outcomes of pharmacological treatments for opioid dependence: does methadone still lead the pack?

PLoS One. 2014; 9(11): e112328. Methadone Induction in Primary Care for Opioid Dependence: A Pragmatic Randomized Trial (ANRS Methaville).

Curr Psychiatry Rev. 2014 May; 10(2): 156–167. Genetics of Opioid Dependence: A Review of the Genetic Contribution to Opioid Dependence. 

Drug Alcohol Depend. 2016 Mar 1; 160: 112–118. Methadone, Buprenorphine and Preferences for Opioid Agonist Treatment: A Qualitative Analysis. 

Croat Med J. 2013 Feb; 54(1): 42–48. Risk factors for fatal outcome in patients with opioid dependence treated with methadone in a family medicine setting in Croatia. 

J Med Toxicol. 2016 Mar; 12(1): 58–63. Pharmacotherapy of Opioid Addiction: “Putting a Real Face on a False Demon”. 

Syst Rev. 2014; 3: 45. Sex differences in outcomes of methadone maintenance treatment for opioid addiction: a systematic review protocol.

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